Zero is the integer denoted 0 that, when used as a counting number, means that no objects are present. It is the only integer (and, in fact, the only real number) that is neither negative nor positive. A number which is not zero is said to lớn be nonzero. A root of a function

*
is also sometimes known as "a zero of
*
."

*

The Schoolhouse Rock segment "My Hero, Zero" (Multiplication Rock, Season 1, Episode 2, 1973) extols the virtues of zero with such praises as, "My hero, zero Such a funny little anh hùng But till you came along We counted on our fingers & toes Now you"re here khổng lồ stay & nobody really knows How wonderful you are Why we could never reach a star Without you, zero, my hero How wonderful you are."

Zero is commonly taken khổng lồ have the factorization

*
(e.g., in the romanhords.com Language"s FactorInteger command). On the other hand, the divisors and divisor function
*
are generally taken to be undefined, since by convention,
*
(i.e.,
*
divides 0) for every
*
except zero.

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Because the number of permutations of 0 elements is 1,

*
(zero factorial) is defined as 1 (Wells 1986, p.31). This definition is useful in expressing many mathematical identities in simple form.

*

A number other than 0 taken to the nguồn 0 is definedto be 1, which follows from the limit


*
0)a^x=1. " />

(1)

This fact is illustrated by the convergence of curves at

*
in the plot above, which shows
*
for
*
, 0.4, ..., 2.0. It can also be seen more intuitively by noting that repeatedly taking the square root of a number
*
1" /> gives smaller & smaller numbers that approach one from above, while doing the same with a number between 0 và 1 gives larger & larger numbers that approach one from below. For
*
square roots, the total nguồn taken is
*
, which approaches 0 as
*
is large, giving
*
in the limit that
*
is large.

*
itself is undefined. The lack of a well-defined meaning for this quantity follows from the mutually contradictory facts that
*
is always 1, so
*
should equal 1, but
*
is always 0 (for
*
0" />), so
*
should equal 0. It could be argued that
*
is a natural definition since


*
0)n^n=lim_(n->0^+)n^n=lim_(n->0^-)n^n=1. " />

(2)

However, the limit does not exist for general complex values of

*
. Therefore, the choice of definition for
*
is usually defined to lớn be indeterminate.

However, defining

*
allows some formulas to lớn be expressed simply (Knuth 1992; Knuth 1997, p.57), an example of which is the beautiful analytical formula for the integral of the generalized sinc function


*
^c " />

(3)

given by Kogan (cf. Espinosa và Moll 2000), where

*
=b>c" />,
*
, và
*
is the floor function.

Richardson"s theorem is a fundamental result in decidability theory which establishes that the determination of whether even simple expressions are identically equal lớn zero is undecidable in principle, let alone in practice.

The following table gives the first few numbers

*
such that the decimal expansion of
*
contains no zeros for small
*
(a problem that resembles Gelfand"s question.) The largest known
*
for which
*
contain no zeros is 86 (Madachy 1979), with no other
*
occurs at the 217th decimal place, the farthest over for powers up lớn
*
.


*
Sloane
*
such that
*
contains no 0s
2A0073771, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 24, 25, 27, 28, ...
3A0307001, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, ...
4A0307011, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 36, 38, 43, ...
5A0088391, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 17, 18, 30, 33, 58, ...
6A0307021, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 17, 24, 29, 44, ...
7A0307031, 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 19, 35
8A0307041, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 17, 24, 27
9A0307051, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 17, 34
11A0307061, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 41, ...

While it has not been proven that the numbers listed above are the only ones without zeros for a given base, the probability that any additional ones exist is vanishingly small. Under this assumption, the sequence of largest

*
such that
*
contains no zeros for
*
, 3, ... Is then given by 86, 68, 43, 58, 44, 35, 27, 34, 0, 41, ... (OEIS A020665).


See also

1, 2, 10, Airy Function Zeros, Approximate Zero, Bessel Function Zeros, Constant Problem, Division by Zero, Fallacy, Hidden Zero, Identically Zero, Naught, Negative, Nonnegative, Nonzero, Positive, Power, Richardson"s Theorem, Root, Uniformity Conjecture, Vanishing, Vanish Identically, Zero Divisor, Zero-Form, Zero Matrix, Zero-Sum Game, Zerofree

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*

References

Beeler, M. & Gosper, R.W. Chiến thắng 57 in Beeler, M.; Gosper, R.W.; & Schroeppel, R. HAKMEM. Cambridge, MA: MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Memo AIM-239, p.22, Feb. 1972. Http://www.inwap.com/pdp10/hbaker/hakmem/number.html#item57.Espinosa, O. And Moll, V.H. "On Some Definite Integrals Involving the Hurwitz Zeta Function." https://arxiv.org/abs/math/0012078. 11 Dec 2000.Finch, S.R. Mathematical Constants. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003.Knuth, D.E. "Two Notes on Notation." Amer. Math. Monthly 99
, 403-422, 1992.Knuth, D.E. The Art of Computer Programming, Vol.1: Fundamental Algorithms, 3rd ed. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, p.57, 1997.Kogan, S. "A chú ý on Definite Integrals Involving Trigonometric Functions." Unpublished manuscript, n.d.Madachy, J.S. Madachy"s Mathematical Recreations. New York: Dover, pp.127-128, 1979.Pappas, T. "Zero-Where và When." The Joy of Mathematics. San Carlos, CA: Wide World Publ./Tetra, p.162, 1989.Sloane, N.J.A. Sequence A007377/M0485 in "The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences."Wells, D. The Penguin Dictionary of Curious and Interesting Numbers. Middlesex, England: Penguin Books, pp.23-26, 1986.YouTube. "My Hero, Zero." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1yPuSP1HPY.

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Weisstein, Eric W. "Zero." From romanhords.com--Aromanhords.com website Resource. Https://romanhords.com/Zero.html

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